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 CASE REPORT
Year : 2012  |  Volume : 22  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 314-317

Reversible dialysis-dependent renal failure due to undiagnosed renovascular disease


1 Department of Nephrology, Medwin Hospital, Nampally, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India
2 Department of Vascular Surgery, Medwin Hospital, Nampally, Hyderabad, Andhra Pradesh, India

Correspondence Address:
R Jha
Medwin Hospitals, Chirag Ali Lane, Abids, Hyderabad - 500 001, Andhra Pradesh
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0971-4065.101267

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Renovascular disease (RVD) can present with resistant hypertension, acute or rapidly progressive renal failure and occasionally nephrotic proteinuria. Revascularization plays an important role in controlling blood pressure and preserving renal function. It is widely believed that delay in revascularization would result in irreversible loss of renal function. However, we report a favorable outcome despite delayed revascularization in two patients of RVD- one presenting with recurrent flash pulmonary edema and other with progressive renal failure. The former's serum creatinine returned to normal despite 3 months of anuria and the latter became dialysis-independent despite 2 months of progressive decline in renal function. Both remain dialysis-free 3 years after surgery.






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Indian Journal of Nephrology
Published by Wolters Kluwer - Medknow
Online since 20th Sept '07