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 ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2017  |  Volume : 27  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 108-112

Anti-glomerular basement membrane disease: Case series from a tertiary center in North India


1 Department of Nephrology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
2 Department of Histopathology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India
3 Department of Immunopathology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh, India

Correspondence Address:
M Rathi
Department of Nephrology, Postgraduate Institute of Medical Education and Research, Chandigarh - 160 012
India
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/0971-4065.171227

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Anti-glomerular basement (anti-GBM) disease is an uncommon disorder with a bimodal age of presentation. Patients presenting with dialysis-dependent renal failure have poor renal outcomes. There is limited data regarding the clinical presentation and outcomes of anti-GBM disease from India. We conducted this prospective study to analyze the clinical presentation and outcomes of anti-GBM disease at a large tertiary care hospital in North India over 1½ years. Subjects with a biopsy proven anti-GBM disease (light microscopic examination showing crescents and immunofluorescence examination showing linear deposition of IgG) with or without positive anti-GBM antibodies in serum were included in the study and followed-up for at least 12 months. All the patients were treated with steroids, cyclophosphamide, and plasma exchange. A total of 17 patients (nine males) were included. The mean age at presentation was 39.11 ± 16.58 (range 11–72) years. Twelve patients (70%) presented with rapidly progressive glomerulonephritis (RPGN), 4 (23.5%) presented with Goodpasture syndrome, while 1 (5.8%) had nephritic syndrome, 7 (41%) were hypertensive, and 14 (82.3%) required dialysis at the time of presentation. Four patients (23.5%) had associated anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibody positivity (anti-myeloperoxidase antibodies in all). Fourteen (87.5%) patients had crescentic glomerulonephritis, while 5 (31.25%) showed necrotizing (n = 4) or granulomatous (n = 1) in the vasculitis. Of 16 patients who received treatment, four (23.25%) achieved complete remission. In this single-center study, the majority of anti-GBM disease patients presented with RPGN and had crescentic glomerulonephritis on biopsy with poor treatment outcome.






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